Scottish Comic Artist Jim Baikie Dies

Scottish Comic Artist Jim Baikie Dies

Skizz Artist Passes Away

♦ Sad news has just reached us that Scottish comic artist Jim Baikie, who was best known for his work on Skizz with Alan Moore and Electric Warrior with Doug Moench for DC…

Here is his bio courtesy of wikipedia:

Baikie began his career illustrating Valentine for Fleetway. Over the next twenty years, he built a solid reputation working for TV comics such as Look-in, including adaptations of The Monkees and Star Trek, all scripted by Angus P. Allan. He also worked extensively in girls’ comics such as Jinty. In the 1980s, Baikie drew The Twilight World in Warrior.

In Britain, he is probably best known for collaborating with Alan Moore on Skizz, which drew some of its inspiration from the same place that Steven Spielberg’s E.T.. did. Baikie was so attached to the character that he went on to both write and illustrate Skizz II and Skizz III for 2000AD. 2000 AD spin-of Crisis also saw Baikie produce the art for the New Statesmen story.

Baikie has also worked extensively in the United States, on superhero strips such as Batman and The Spectre. In 1986, he co-created Electric Warrior with writer Doug Moench. A new collaboration with Alan Moore also appeared in the guise of the First American for America’s Best Comics.

Wikipedia Jim Baikie entry

Jim Baikie Obituay www.tripwiremagazine.co.uk

  1. WO!!!….Hold up!!! — Skizz was NEVER a reworking of ET. Skizz was green-lit by 2000AD and underway before ET was announced, I believe a quirk of publication timing meant ET was public first, sadly.

    Reply
    • Sure you are correct.

      Reply
    • To be fair, I remember thinking that when it came out – it was only reading Steve McManus’s memoir The Mighty One: My Life Inside the Nerve Centre recently that told me I was wrong. And remembering Moore’s larcenous past (Dr & Quinch/OC and Stiggs) it seemed likely…

      Reply
  2. “…it wasn’t swiped from Steven Spielberg, not at all, but there’s an awful lot in there that owes far too much to Alan Bleasdale.” — Alan Moore quoted in Thrill-Power Overload

    Reply

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